Just another WordPress.com site

Posts tagged ‘nutrition’

Educational Food Websites!

So, even though I’m off on summer vacation as of last week I won’t have access to an oven until May 24th at the earliest. This means that I’m still living in my dorm room, currently surviving on peanut butter sandwiches, oatmeal and frozen vegetables. This is what happens when the most technological piece of kitchen equipment in your dorm is a microwave.

like this only a lot less high tech

So, in short I’m rapidly running out of bread because the most I can do to spice up a meal is put it in the microwave.

Right now I’m on a hunt for the healthiest whole wheat bread I can find (and hopefully something reasonably cheap as well). Although my main grocery options are Kroger or CVS, the internet helped me find a fantastic website that will help me significantly in my search for a peanut butter sandwich.

If you haven’t heard of it before, check out fooducate.com.

This website rates products based on their overall nutritional value going beyond the standard nutrition label of calories, fat content and sugars. For people who really want to know what’s up with their food, fooducate will you tell you that

Great Grains Bakery 100% Whole Wheat & Honey Bread:

  1. has 120 calories per serving (per slice)
  2. has caramel coloring

The caramel coloring fooducate goes into detail on as a point in this product to watch out for. As fooducate explains:

Homemade caramel is made by melting sugar in a saucepan.

Brown coloring in sodas and some other products is not the same thing.

Industrial caramel coloring is made by reacting sugars with ammonia and sulfites under high pressure and temperatures. The chemical reactions create 4-methylimidazole, which in government-conducted studies caused lung, liver, or thyroid cancer or leukemia in laboratory mice or rats. This is why California recently required foods containing caramel color to be labeled as potential cancer-causing agents.

But you won’t see this warning label any time soon – manufacturers simply reduced the use of caramel color enough that the labeling requirements no longer applied.

Caramel color varies slightly between products – when in beer, sauces or baked goods it has just ammonia and when used in soft drinks, it has both sulfites and ammonia. Neither one is a “good” option.

Although the bread has an A- rating and is by most reviews a high quality product, fooducate wants its readers to be as healthy as possible and know what they’re eating beyond the basic nutritional information.

I’m still on the look out for the perfect bread, but now I have a few ideas of what to look for in my bread choices beyond the obvious avoidance of high fructose corn syrup. While I would much rather make my own bread, that won’t be an option for another 9 days.

If you have a bread you’re interested in highlighting or recommending me to try, please suggest it! I’m looking forward to starting up my Product Placement line again.

 

 

Product Placement: The Baker Yoga Bread

My mother introduces me to all the best foods. She manages to find food that is great for you and tastes better than standard commercial products and I wish to model Cheryl’s Confections after her example. This post is not just a Product Placement, but is dedicated to my mom and every parent who invests in his or her child’s health and well being. Here’s to you parents, enjoy the post and consider trying this product.

My mom is a yoga teacher and I’m still not quite sure if Yoga Bread caught her attention because of its name or because of the natural ingredients.

This bread has been a conundrum to me for years. My mom buys it whenever she gets a chance to do so, but it never made any sense to me, why put fruit into bread? what made this yoga bread? what is yoga bread? I could have gotten some answers any time if I just decided to either try a piece (like I finally did yesterday) or just read the packaging information. All I really knew about this bread was that it was not cheap (unfortunately its only flaw).

Yes, so if I had ever bothered to read the labeling, I would have come to realize that this is Yoga Bread because it promotes more than just healthy eating: it promotes healthy lifestyles centered around a balance of the body.

As the packaging says:

Yoga is more than practicing asanas [postures]! Yoga is about cultivating the authentic you while being mindful of your body, to thers, and this earth. There are five yogic principles to follow: 

proper exercise

proper breathing

proper relaxation

proper diet and

positive thinking and meditation.

The serving size is 1 slice, each slice 120 calories, with 3 grams of fat (no trans fats or sat fats) 0 grams cholesterol, 22o mg sodium, 21 grams carbs, 3 grams fiber, 4 grams of sugar, and 4 grams of protein.

This whole wheat bread is sweetened naturally with dried cranberries and has a subtle nutty crunch flavor due to pumpkin seeds, flax seeds, and sunflower seeds. The taste is surprisingly similar to a rye bread though no rye flour is used and the bread is far less dark in coloring than a standard rye.

After being adventurous last night and trying a piece of my mom’s bread, I have gone from a skeptic of fruit/nut breads to a true believer. I am now looking into finding a recipe that can recreate these healthy, nutty, sweet results.

If anyone has any fruit/nut bread recipes to share I would love to hear from you.

Until next time, then. Enjoy and make sure to give this bread a try for your family! This is not a product to pass over lightly.